fixyourwritinghabits
bizarreismm:

Collection of the Creepiest and the Weirdest Wikipedia Pages
I’ve seen quite a few similar posts floating around, so here’s one with some pages that weren’t included in the others. Just as all these posts go, do not read if you are easily disturbed or triggered. Some of these are extremely graphic.
Crimes & Killers:
Hinterkaifeck MurdersThe Vampire Rapist The Hi-Fi MurdersHello Kitty MurderSasebo SlashingKeddie MurdersMurder of James BulgerDnepropetrovsk Maniacs (3 Guys 1 Hammer)Sada AbeThe Vampire of SacramentoThe Little Girl MurdererTylenol MurdersIssei SagawaLuka MagnottaBlood CountessMurder of Tim McLeanThe Boy in the BoxMurder of Shanda SharerRobert PicktonTheresa KnorrStrip Search Phone Call ScamUnit 731Rape of NankingHoeryong Concentration CampSawney Bean
The Unknown:
Kelly-Hopkinsville EncounterBelmez FacesGefJimmy Carter UFO IncidentHidebehindLeyakClinton RoadCicada 3301Rosalia LombardoWeeping StatueExorcism of Anneliese MichelLa LloronaThe Superman CurseEctoplasmKuchisake-Onna (Slit Mouthed Woman)Rat KingSS BaychimoSalish Sea Human Foot DiscoveriesGreen Children of WoolpitSkinwalker RanchDevil’s Tramping GroundPope Lick MonsterDevil’s Chair
Medicine:
Revival ExperimentsCotard DelusionElephant ManPenis PanicThe Toxic LadySensory DeprivationYoungest MotherBrain Eating AmoebaLocked In SyndromeStendhal SyndromeJerusalem SyndromeSelf EnucleationStanford Prison ExperimentPit of DespairHarlequin-Type IchthyosisGenie the Feral ChildBenjamin KyleTarrare
Torture:
ScaphismTorture Methods and DevicesThe Pear of AnguishHanged, Drawn, and QuarteredRat TortureBrazen BullSlow SlicingImmurementBoilingSleep DeprivationStress PositionsHamstringing
Conspiracies & Stories:
Black HelicoptersThe Licked HandChemtrail ConspiracyNew World Order ConspiracyKiller in the BackseatI Have No Mouth and I Must ScreamBoy Scout LaneNew City VillageThe Clinton Body CountDenver International Airport Conspiracy

Miscellaneous:
Yosemite SamThe Station Nightclub FireRogue WavesVagina DentataMongolian Death WormList of Unusual DeathsBeing Buried AliveDaycare Sex Abuse HysteriaCarl TanzlerBog BodiesA Serbian FilmCannibal HolocaustDead HandAction Park120 Days of SodomHuman Corpse SoapChristine ChubbuckTraumatic InseminationJohn Fare

bizarreismm:

Collection of the Creepiest and the Weirdest Wikipedia Pages

I’ve seen quite a few similar posts floating around, so here’s one with some pages that weren’t included in the others. Just as all these posts go, do not read if you are easily disturbed or triggered. Some of these are extremely graphic.

Crimes & Killers:

Hinterkaifeck Murders
The Vampire Rapist 
The Hi-Fi Murders
Hello Kitty Murder
Sasebo Slashing
Keddie Murders
Murder of James Bulger
Dnepropetrovsk Maniacs (3 Guys 1 Hammer)
Sada Abe
The Vampire of Sacramento
The Little Girl Murderer
Tylenol Murders
Issei Sagawa
Luka Magnotta
Blood Countess
Murder of Tim McLean
The Boy in the Box
Murder of Shanda Sharer
Robert Pickton
Theresa Knorr
Strip Search Phone Call Scam
Unit 731
Rape of Nanking
Hoeryong Concentration Camp
Sawney Bean

The Unknown:

Kelly-Hopkinsville Encounter
Belmez Faces
Gef
Jimmy Carter UFO Incident
Hidebehind
Leyak
Clinton Road
Cicada 3301
Rosalia LombardoWeeping Statue
Exorcism of Anneliese Michel
La Llorona
The Superman Curse
EctoplasmKuchisake-Onna (Slit Mouthed Woman)
Rat King
SS Baychimo
Salish Sea Human Foot Discoveries
Green Children of Woolpit
Skinwalker Ranch
Devil’s Tramping Ground
Pope Lick Monster
Devil’s Chair

Medicine:

Revival Experiments
Cotard Delusion
Elephant Man
Penis Panic
The Toxic Lady
Sensory Deprivation
Youngest MotherBrain Eating Amoeba
Locked In Syndrome
Stendhal Syndrome
Jerusalem Syndrome
Self Enucleation
Stanford Prison Experiment
Pit of Despair
Harlequin-Type Ichthyosis
Genie the Feral Child
Benjamin Kyle
Tarrare

Torture:

Scaphism
Torture Methods and Devices
The Pear of Anguish
Hanged, Drawn, and Quartered
Rat Torture
Brazen Bull
Slow Slicing
Immurement
Boiling
Sleep Deprivation
Stress Positions
Hamstringing

Conspiracies & Stories:

Black Helicopters
The Licked Hand
Chemtrail Conspiracy
New World Order Conspiracy
Killer in the Backseat
I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream
Boy Scout Lane
New City Village
The Clinton Body Count
Denver International Airport Conspiracy



Miscellaneous:

Yosemite Sam
The Station Nightclub Fire
Rogue Waves
Vagina Dentata
Mongolian Death Worm
List of Unusual Deaths
Being Buried Alive
Daycare Sex Abuse Hysteria
Carl Tanzler
Bog Bodies
A Serbian Film
Cannibal Holocaust
Dead Hand
Action Park
120 Days of Sodom
Human Corpse Soap
Christine Chubbuck
Traumatic Insemination
John Fare

thewritingcafe
thewritingcafe:


BASICS:

Genres:

Alternate World: A setting that is not our world, but may be similar. This includes “portal fantasies” in which characters find an alternative world through their own. An example would be The Chronicles of Narnia.

Arabian: Fantasy that is based on the Middle East and North Africa.

Arthurian: Set in Camelot and deals with Arthurian mythology and legends.

Bangsian: Set in the afterlife or deals heavily with the afterlife. It most often deals with famous and historical people as characters. An example could be The Lovely Bones.


Celtic: Fantasy that is based on the Celtic people, most often the Irish.

Christian: This genre has Christian themes and elements.

Classical: Based on Roman and Greek myths.

Contemporary: This genre takes place in modern society in which paranormal and magical creatures live among us. An example would be the Harry Potter series.

Dark: This genre combines fantasy and horror elements. The tone or feel of dark fantasy is often gloomy, bleak, and gothic.

Epic: This genre is long and, as the name says, epic. Epic is similar to high fantasy, but has more importance, meaning, or depth. Epic fantasy is most often in a medieval setting.

Gaslamp: Also known as gaslight, this genre has a Victorian or Edwardian setting.

Gunpowder: Gunpowder crosses epic or high fantasy with “rifles and railroads”, but the technology remains realistic unlike the similar genre of steampunk.

Heroic: Centers on one or more heroes who start out as humble, unlikely heroes thrown into a plot that challenges them.

High: This is considered the “classic” fantasy genre. High fantasy contains the general fantasy elements and is set in a fictional world.

Historical: The setting in this genre is any time period within our world that has fantasy elements added.

Medieval: Set between ancient times and the industrial era. Often set in Europe and involves knights. (medieval references)

Mythic: Fantasy involving or based on myths, folklore, and fairy tales.

Portal: Involves a portal, doorway, or other entryway that leads the protagonist from the “normal world” to the “magical world”.

Quest: As the name suggests, the protagonist in this genre sets out on a quest. The protagonist most frequently searches for an object of importance and returns home with it.

Sword and Sorcery: Pseudomedieval settings in which the characters use swords and engage in action-packed plots. Magic is also an element, as is romance.

Urban: Has a modern or urban setting in which magic and paranormal creatures exist, often in secret.

Wuxia: A genre in which the protagonist learns a martial art and follows a code. This genre is popular in Chinese speaking areas.
Word Counts:
Word counts for fantasy are longer than other genres because of the need for world building. Even in fantasy that takes place in our world, there is a need for the introduction of the fantasy aspect.
Word counts for established authors with a fan base can run higher because publishers are willing to take a higher chance on those authors. First-time authors (who have little to no fan base) will most likely not publish a longer book through traditional publishing. Established authors may also have better luck with publishing a novel far shorter than that genre’s expected or desired word count, though first-time authors may achieve this as well.
A general rule of thumb for first-time authors is to stay under 100k and probably under 110k for fantasy.
Other exceptions to word count guidelines would be for short fiction (novellas, novelettes, short stories, etc.) and that one great author who shows up every few years with a perfect 200k manuscript.
But why are there word count guidelines? For young readers, it’s pretty obvious why books should be shorter. For other age groups, it comes down to the editor’s preference, shelf space in book stores, and the cost of publishing a book. The bigger the book, the more expensive it is to publish.
General Fantasy: 75k - 110k
Epic Fantasy: 90k - 120k
Contemporary Fantasy: 90k - 120k
Urban Fantasy: 80k - 100k
Middle Grade: 45k - 70k
YA: 75k - 120k (depending on sub-genre)
Adult: 80k - 120k (depending on sub-genre)

WORLD BUILDING:


A pseudo-European medieval setting is fine, but it’s overdone. And it’s always full of white men and white women in disguise as white men because around 85% (ignore my guess/exaggeration, I only put it there for emphasis) of fantasy writers seem to have trouble letting go of patriarchal societies. 
Guys. It’s fantasy. You can do whatever you want. You can write a fantasy that takes place in a jungle. Or in a desert. Or in a prairie. The people can be extremely diverse in one region and less diverse in another. The cultures should differ. Different voices should be heard. Queer people exist. People of color exist. Not everyone has two arms or two legs or the ability to hear.
As for the fantasy elements, you also make up the rules. Don’t go searching around about how a certain magic spell is done, just make it up. Magic can be whatever color you want. It can be no color at all. You can use as much or as little magic as you want.
Keep track of what you put into your world and stick to the rules. There should be limits, laws, cultures, climates, disputes, and everything else that exists in our world. However, you don’t have to go over every subject when writing your story.
World Building:
Fantasy World Building Questionnaire
Magical World Builder’s Guide
Creating Fantasy and Science Fiction Worlds
Creating Religions
Quick and Dirty World Building
World Building Links
Fantasy World Building Questions

The Seed of Government (2)
Guide to Science Fiction and Fantasy
Fantasy Worlds and Race
Water Geography
Alternate Medieval Fantasy Story
Writing Magic
Types of Magic
When Magic Goes Wrong
Magic-Like Psychic Abilities
Science and Magic
Creative Uses of Magic
Thoughts on Creating Magic Systems
Defining the Sources, Effects, and Costs of Magic
World Building Basics
Mythology Master Post
Fantasy Religions
Setting the Fantastic in the Everyday World
Making Histories
Matching Your Money to Your World
Building a Better Beast
A Man in Beast’s Clothing
Creating and Using Fictional Languages
Creating a Language
Creating Fictional Holidays
Creating Holidays
Weather and World Building 101
Describing Fantastic Creatures
Medieval Technology
Music For Your Fantasy World
A heterogeneous World
Articles on World Building
Cliches:

Grand List of Fantasy Cliches (most of this can be debated)
Fantasy Cliches Discussion
Ten Fantasy Cliches That Should Be Put to Rest
Seven Fantasy Cliches That Need to Disappear
Avoiding Fantasy Cliches 101
Avoiding Fantasy Cliches
Fantasy Cliches
Fantasy Cliche Meter: The Bad Guys
Fantasy Novelist’s Exam
Mary Sue Race Test
Note: Species (like elves and dwarves) are not cliches. The way they are executed are cliches.

CHARACTERS
Read More

Best

thewritingcafe:

BASICS:

Genres:

  • Alternate World: A setting that is not our world, but may be similar. This includes “portal fantasies” in which characters find an alternative world through their own. An example would be The Chronicles of Narnia.
  • Arabian: Fantasy that is based on the Middle East and North Africa.
  • Arthurian: Set in Camelot and deals with Arthurian mythology and legends.
  • Bangsian: Set in the afterlife or deals heavily with the afterlife. It most often deals with famous and historical people as characters. An example could be The Lovely Bones.
  • Celtic: Fantasy that is based on the Celtic people, most often the Irish.
  • Christian: This genre has Christian themes and elements.
  • Classical: Based on Roman and Greek myths.
  • Contemporary: This genre takes place in modern society in which paranormal and magical creatures live among us. An example would be the Harry Potter series.
  • Dark: This genre combines fantasy and horror elements. The tone or feel of dark fantasy is often gloomy, bleak, and gothic.
  • Epic: This genre is long and, as the name says, epic. Epic is similar to high fantasy, but has more importance, meaning, or depth. Epic fantasy is most often in a medieval setting.
  • Gaslamp: Also known as gaslight, this genre has a Victorian or Edwardian setting.
  • Gunpowder: Gunpowder crosses epic or high fantasy with “rifles and railroads”, but the technology remains realistic unlike the similar genre of steampunk.
  • Heroic: Centers on one or more heroes who start out as humble, unlikely heroes thrown into a plot that challenges them.
  • High: This is considered the “classic” fantasy genre. High fantasy contains the general fantasy elements and is set in a fictional world.
  • Historical: The setting in this genre is any time period within our world that has fantasy elements added.
  • Medieval: Set between ancient times and the industrial era. Often set in Europe and involves knights. (medieval references)
  • Mythic: Fantasy involving or based on myths, folklore, and fairy tales.
  • Portal: Involves a portal, doorway, or other entryway that leads the protagonist from the “normal world” to the “magical world”.
  • Quest: As the name suggests, the protagonist in this genre sets out on a quest. The protagonist most frequently searches for an object of importance and returns home with it.
  • Sword and Sorcery: Pseudomedieval settings in which the characters use swords and engage in action-packed plots. Magic is also an element, as is romance.
  • Urban: Has a modern or urban setting in which magic and paranormal creatures exist, often in secret.
  • Wuxia: A genre in which the protagonist learns a martial art and follows a code. This genre is popular in Chinese speaking areas.

Word Counts:

Word counts for fantasy are longer than other genres because of the need for world building. Even in fantasy that takes place in our world, there is a need for the introduction of the fantasy aspect.

Word counts for established authors with a fan base can run higher because publishers are willing to take a higher chance on those authors. First-time authors (who have little to no fan base) will most likely not publish a longer book through traditional publishing. Established authors may also have better luck with publishing a novel far shorter than that genre’s expected or desired word count, though first-time authors may achieve this as well.

A general rule of thumb for first-time authors is to stay under 100k and probably under 110k for fantasy.

Other exceptions to word count guidelines would be for short fiction (novellas, novelettes, short stories, etc.) and that one great author who shows up every few years with a perfect 200k manuscript.

But why are there word count guidelines? For young readers, it’s pretty obvious why books should be shorter. For other age groups, it comes down to the editor’s preference, shelf space in book stores, and the cost of publishing a book. The bigger the book, the more expensive it is to publish.

  • General Fantasy: 75k - 110k
  • Epic Fantasy: 90k - 120k
  • Contemporary Fantasy: 90k - 120k
  • Urban Fantasy: 80k - 100k
  • Middle Grade: 45k - 70k
  • YA: 75k - 120k (depending on sub-genre)
  • Adult: 80k - 120k (depending on sub-genre)

WORLD BUILDING:

A pseudo-European medieval setting is fine, but it’s overdone. And it’s always full of white men and white women in disguise as white men because around 85% (ignore my guess/exaggeration, I only put it there for emphasis) of fantasy writers seem to have trouble letting go of patriarchal societies. 

Guys. It’s fantasy. You can do whatever you want. You can write a fantasy that takes place in a jungle. Or in a desert. Or in a prairie. The people can be extremely diverse in one region and less diverse in another. The cultures should differ. Different voices should be heard. Queer people exist. People of color exist. Not everyone has two arms or two legs or the ability to hear.

As for the fantasy elements, you also make up the rules. Don’t go searching around about how a certain magic spell is done, just make it up. Magic can be whatever color you want. It can be no color at all. You can use as much or as little magic as you want.

Keep track of what you put into your world and stick to the rules. There should be limits, laws, cultures, climates, disputes, and everything else that exists in our world. However, you don’t have to go over every subject when writing your story.

World Building:

Cliches:

Note: Species (like elves and dwarves) are not cliches. The way they are executed are cliches.

CHARACTERS

Read More

Best

fixyourwritinghabits
thewritingcafe:

BASICS:

Genres:
Alternate World: A setting that is not our world, but may be similar. This includes “portal fantasies” in which characters find an alternative world through their own. An example would be The Chronicles of Narnia.
Arabian: Fantasy that is based on the Middle East and North Africa.
Arthurian: Set in Camelot and deals with Arthurian mythology and legends.
Bangsian: Set in the afterlife or deals heavily with the afterlife. It most often deals with famous and historical people as characters. An example could be The Lovely Bones.
Celtic: Fantasy that is based on the Celtic people, most often the Irish.
Christian: This genre has Christian themes and elements.
Classical: Based on Roman and Greek myths.
Contemporary: This genre takes place in modern society in which paranormal and magical creatures live among us. An example would be the Harry Potter series.
Dark: This genre combines fantasy and horror elements. The tone or feel of dark fantasy is often gloomy, bleak, and gothic.
Epic: This genre is long and, as the name says, epic. Epic is similar to high fantasy, but has more importance, meaning, or depth. Epic fantasy is most often in a medieval setting.
Gaslamp: Also known as gaslight, this genre has a Victorian or Edwardian setting.
Gunpowder: Gunpowder crosses epic or high fantasy with “rifles and railroads”, but the technology remains realistic unlike the similar genre of steampunk.
Heroic: Centers on one or more heroes who start out as humble, unlikely heroes thrown into a plot that challenges them.
High: This is considered the “classic” fantasy genre. High fantasy contains the general fantasy elements and is set in a fictional world.
Historical: The setting in this genre is any time period within our world that has fantasy elements added.
Medieval: Set between ancient times and the industrial era. Often set in Europe and involves knights. (medieval references)
Mythic: Fantasy involving or based on myths, folklore, and fairy tales.
Portal: Involves a portal, doorway, or other entryway that leads the protagonist from the “normal world” to the “magical world”.
Quest: As the name suggests, the protagonist in this genre sets out on a quest. The protagonist most frequently searches for an object of importance and returns home with it.
Sword and Sorcery: Pseudomedieval settings in which the characters use swords and engage in action-packed plots. Magic is also an element, as is romance.
Urban: Has a modern or urban setting in which magic and paranormal creatures exist, often in secret.
Wuxia: A genre in which the protagonist learns a martial art and follows a code. This genre is popular in Chinese speaking areas.
Word Counts:
Word counts for fantasy are longer than other genres because of the need for world building. Even in fantasy that takes place in our world, there is a need for the introduction of the fantasy aspect.
Word counts for established authors with a fan base can run higher because publishers are willing to take a higher chance on those authors. First-time authors (who have little to no fan base) will most likely not publish a longer book through traditional publishing. Established authors may also have better luck with publishing a novel far shorter than that genre’s expected or desired word count, though first-time authors may achieve this as well.
A general rule of thumb for first-time authors is to stay under 100k and probably under 110k for fantasy.
Other exceptions to word count guidelines would be for short fiction (novellas, novelettes, short stories, etc.) and that one great author who shows up every few years with a perfect 200k manuscript.
But why are there word count guidelines? For young readers, it’s pretty obvious why books should be shorter. For other age groups, it comes down to the editor’s preference, shelf space in book stores, and the cost of publishing a book. The bigger the book, the more expensive it is to publish.
General Fantasy: 75k - 110k
Epic Fantasy: 90k - 120k
Contemporary Fantasy: 90k - 120k
Urban Fantasy: 80k - 100k
Middle Grade: 45k - 70k
YA: 75k - 120k (depending on sub-genre)
Adult: 80k - 120k (depending on sub-genre)

WORLD BUILDING:

A pseudo-European medieval setting is fine, but it’s overdone. And it’s always full of white men and white women in disguise as white men because around 85% (ignore my guess/exaggeration, I only put it there for emphasis) of fantasy writers seem to have trouble letting go of patriarchal societies. 
Guys. It’s fantasy. You can do whatever you want. You can write a fantasy that takes place in a jungle. Or in a desert. Or in a prairie. The people can be extremely diverse in one region and less diverse in another. The cultures should differ. Different voices should be heard. Queer people exist. People of color exist. Not everyone has two arms or two legs or the ability to hear.
As for the fantasy elements, you also make up the rules. Don’t go searching around about how a certain magic spell is done, just make it up. Magic can be whatever color you want. It can be no color at all. You can use as much or as little magic as you want.
Keep track of what you put into your world and stick to the rules. There should be limits, laws, cultures, climates, disputes, and everything else that exists in our world. However, you don’t have to go over every subject when writing your story.
World Building:
Fantasy World Building Questionnaire
Magical World Builder’s Guide
Creating Fantasy and Science Fiction Worlds
Creating Religions
Quick and Dirty World Building
World Building Links
Fantasy World Building Questions
The Seed of Government (2)
Guide to Science Fiction and Fantasy
Fantasy Worlds and Race
Water Geography
Alternate Medieval Fantasy Story
Writing Magic
Types of Magic
When Magic Goes Wrong
Magic-Like Psychic Abilities
Science and Magic
Creative Uses of Magic
Thoughts on Creating Magic Systems
Defining the Sources, Effects, and Costs of Magic
World Building Basics
Mythology Master Post
Fantasy Religions
Setting the Fantastic in the Everyday World
Making Histories
Matching Your Money to Your World
Building a Better Beast
A Man in Beast’s Clothing
Creating and Using Fictional Languages
Creating a Language
Creating Fictional Holidays
Creating Holidays
Weather and World Building 101
Describing Fantastic Creatures
Medieval Technology
Music For Your Fantasy World
A heterogeneous World
Articles on World Building
Cliches:
Grand List of Fantasy Cliches (most of this can be debated)
Fantasy Cliches Discussion
Ten Fantasy Cliches That Should Be Put to Rest
Seven Fantasy Cliches That Need to Disappear
Avoiding Fantasy Cliches 101
Avoiding Fantasy Cliches
Fantasy Cliches
Fantasy Cliche Meter: The Bad Guys
Fantasy Novelist’s Exam
Mary Sue Race Test
Note: Species (like elves and dwarves) are not cliches. The way they are executed are cliches.

CHARACTERS

Read More

thewritingcafe:

BASICS:

Genres:

  • Alternate World: A setting that is not our world, but may be similar. This includes “portal fantasies” in which characters find an alternative world through their own. An example would be The Chronicles of Narnia.
  • Arabian: Fantasy that is based on the Middle East and North Africa.
  • Arthurian: Set in Camelot and deals with Arthurian mythology and legends.
  • Bangsian: Set in the afterlife or deals heavily with the afterlife. It most often deals with famous and historical people as characters. An example could be The Lovely Bones.
  • Celtic: Fantasy that is based on the Celtic people, most often the Irish.
  • Christian: This genre has Christian themes and elements.
  • Classical: Based on Roman and Greek myths.
  • Contemporary: This genre takes place in modern society in which paranormal and magical creatures live among us. An example would be the Harry Potter series.
  • Dark: This genre combines fantasy and horror elements. The tone or feel of dark fantasy is often gloomy, bleak, and gothic.
  • Epic: This genre is long and, as the name says, epic. Epic is similar to high fantasy, but has more importance, meaning, or depth. Epic fantasy is most often in a medieval setting.
  • Gaslamp: Also known as gaslight, this genre has a Victorian or Edwardian setting.
  • Gunpowder: Gunpowder crosses epic or high fantasy with “rifles and railroads”, but the technology remains realistic unlike the similar genre of steampunk.
  • Heroic: Centers on one or more heroes who start out as humble, unlikely heroes thrown into a plot that challenges them.
  • High: This is considered the “classic” fantasy genre. High fantasy contains the general fantasy elements and is set in a fictional world.
  • Historical: The setting in this genre is any time period within our world that has fantasy elements added.
  • Medieval: Set between ancient times and the industrial era. Often set in Europe and involves knights. (medieval references)
  • Mythic: Fantasy involving or based on myths, folklore, and fairy tales.
  • Portal: Involves a portal, doorway, or other entryway that leads the protagonist from the “normal world” to the “magical world”.
  • Quest: As the name suggests, the protagonist in this genre sets out on a quest. The protagonist most frequently searches for an object of importance and returns home with it.
  • Sword and Sorcery: Pseudomedieval settings in which the characters use swords and engage in action-packed plots. Magic is also an element, as is romance.
  • Urban: Has a modern or urban setting in which magic and paranormal creatures exist, often in secret.
  • Wuxia: A genre in which the protagonist learns a martial art and follows a code. This genre is popular in Chinese speaking areas.

Word Counts:

Word counts for fantasy are longer than other genres because of the need for world building. Even in fantasy that takes place in our world, there is a need for the introduction of the fantasy aspect.

Word counts for established authors with a fan base can run higher because publishers are willing to take a higher chance on those authors. First-time authors (who have little to no fan base) will most likely not publish a longer book through traditional publishing. Established authors may also have better luck with publishing a novel far shorter than that genre’s expected or desired word count, though first-time authors may achieve this as well.

A general rule of thumb for first-time authors is to stay under 100k and probably under 110k for fantasy.

Other exceptions to word count guidelines would be for short fiction (novellas, novelettes, short stories, etc.) and that one great author who shows up every few years with a perfect 200k manuscript.

But why are there word count guidelines? For young readers, it’s pretty obvious why books should be shorter. For other age groups, it comes down to the editor’s preference, shelf space in book stores, and the cost of publishing a book. The bigger the book, the more expensive it is to publish.

  • General Fantasy: 75k - 110k
  • Epic Fantasy: 90k - 120k
  • Contemporary Fantasy: 90k - 120k
  • Urban Fantasy: 80k - 100k
  • Middle Grade: 45k - 70k
  • YA: 75k - 120k (depending on sub-genre)
  • Adult: 80k - 120k (depending on sub-genre)

WORLD BUILDING:

A pseudo-European medieval setting is fine, but it’s overdone. And it’s always full of white men and white women in disguise as white men because around 85% (ignore my guess/exaggeration, I only put it there for emphasis) of fantasy writers seem to have trouble letting go of patriarchal societies. 

Guys. It’s fantasy. You can do whatever you want. You can write a fantasy that takes place in a jungle. Or in a desert. Or in a prairie. The people can be extremely diverse in one region and less diverse in another. The cultures should differ. Different voices should be heard. Queer people exist. People of color exist. Not everyone has two arms or two legs or the ability to hear.

As for the fantasy elements, you also make up the rules. Don’t go searching around about how a certain magic spell is done, just make it up. Magic can be whatever color you want. It can be no color at all. You can use as much or as little magic as you want.

Keep track of what you put into your world and stick to the rules. There should be limits, laws, cultures, climates, disputes, and everything else that exists in our world. However, you don’t have to go over every subject when writing your story.

World Building:

Cliches:

Note: Species (like elves and dwarves) are not cliches. The way they are executed are cliches.

CHARACTERS

Read More

characterandwritinghelp

alatar-and-pallando:

So, pretty frequently writers screw up when they write about injuries. People are clonked over the head, pass out for hours, and wake up with just a headache… Eragon breaks his wrist and it’s just fine within days… Wounds heal with nary a scar, ever…

I’m aiming to fix…

themazerunnerpt

THE MAZE RUNNER (Videos Masterpost)

themazerunnerpt:

Check out all the videos related to the first movie of the trilogy, ‘The Maze Runner’. This list will probably be updated soon.

Trailers: 1, 2.

Teasers: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Featurettes:

Clips: 

TV Spots:

B-Rool Footage: 1, 2.

Read More

Saved

fluffylaces

fluffylaces:

Minho was slightly getting irritated with this game Alby and Newt were playing. It was obvious. It was there. It was so palpable that even a Greenie could immediately tell that something is going on between them. In fact, everyone in the glade was painfully aware of it.

Except them, of course.